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Re: List of requirements to succeed.

Posted: January 15th, 2020, 9:27 pm
by Andy123
πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

Re: List of requirements to succeed.

Posted: January 15th, 2020, 10:22 pm
by killer
I’ll give you knit one pearl one ,followed by. a stiff uppercut lol

Re: List of requirements to succeed.

Posted: January 16th, 2020, 5:58 am
by buster121
killer wrote: ↑
January 15th, 2020, 10:22 pm
I’ll give you knit one pearl one ,followed by. a stiff uppercut lol
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Re: List of requirements to succeed.

Posted: January 16th, 2020, 7:30 am
by Muzza
Andy123 wrote: ↑
January 15th, 2020, 7:37 pm
killer wrote: ↑
January 15th, 2020, 7:10 pm
Yep very good ,it reminds me of when I was a Boy my Pop had some Cows ,most house holds did ,or some one in the street had them ,at that time ,Andy I had aJersey Cow that followed me every where ,raised her from a couple of days old anyway when she was About 2years Old ,pop must of taken her to a Bull as she got bigger & had a Calf ,which was a young Bull Calf ,so I played with him ,like I had done with his mother as a boy ,But I found out they the Bulls are crazy ,he attacked anyone he saw ,so we used to chain him up ,getting back to pigeons one of the things Pop did was use the first milk produced when gave birth to the pigeons ,mixed in there water ,never questioned. Why ,thinking about it must of been the Probiotics in it , the birds always looked good using it ,cheers
It would probably been because of the colostrum in the first milk. This is usually quite thick but as you say full of goodness and essential to the calf in the first few hours of birth to give it the antibodies against any bugs that may be around the farm or herd.
The channel Island bulls are very temperamental. I had Guernseys when I had my own herd. You always had to be weary of the bulls. In Cornwall we had Holsteins. I had one bull that I showed as a calf so he was halter trained. He was bred from an embryo imported from America and put into one of our own cows. As a 3 year old I had to move him from one yard to another down a road. By this time he was taller than me, and I’m 6ft 4in, and weighing nearly a ton. He hadn’t been on a halter since a calf. I put him in the crush and put the halter on him. I opened the front of the crush and he walked out. I walked him down the road like a puppy 🐢 😊
That would be because you are a good stockman, as much as anything, Andy. Born with it.

It reminds me of when we rented a house on a farm not long after remarrying. I was riding race horses in the mornings, and at a bit of a loose end all day.

The farm had a piggery on it, and one Sunday I found about 20 big pregnant sows wandering around outside my house. I quietly rounded them up and walked them back to the piggery, found an open gate, and figured that's where they had got out of. I put them back, and shut the gate.

Now, any farmer will tell you that herding pigs is like herding cats. :lol:, so when I told the farmer that I found a bunch of his pigs out, and hoped I had put them away in the right place, he was surprised!

Next thing, I am doing the odd bit here and there, moving sows, weaning piglets, and... working the boars. Soon I was the full time boar man.

I was in jockey trim, about 51 kilos, a big boar weighs what, 250 kilos? Most of them were pretty good. You never turned your back on one, or let one get you in a corner, but I had them going well. One old boar, who had lost his ear tag and was recorded as 'Black Pig', was enormous. Huge. He used to wander along with me just resting my hand on his back. :)

Except one. :twisted:

This pig was dangerous. He would eat you.

I used to feed him treats and scratch his back with a hard broom, and in the finish I could work him around the place without wasting half an hour trying to move him. One day I was at home and heard shouting from over at the farm. I scooted over and found the farmer bailed up, with a plywood board between him and the boar, who was foaming at the mouth and trying to get under the board. His wife was screaming, the farm hand was shouting, it was chaos!

I grabbed a scoop full of pig meal, jumped over the fence and stuck the scoop in the pig's mouth. The farmer jumped over the fence. Quickly! :lol:

The pig then followed me around to where was meant to go, like a lamb.

I must admit I was a bit less than polite about it. The bloke thought he was very clever. He was lucky he didn't get badly injured.

Stockmanship is a gift.

Re: List of requirements to succeed.

Posted: January 16th, 2020, 8:25 am
by killer
Should of put a saddle on him &. Rode him back ,lol

Re: List of requirements to succeed.

Posted: January 16th, 2020, 8:59 am
by Andy123
Great little story Murray.
I had many good years working with cattle. There are things about farming that I don’t miss but working with cattle isn’t one of them. Loved it. You get back from any animal what you put in and the respect you show them, they do know!!

Re: List of requirements to succeed.

Posted: January 17th, 2020, 6:43 pm
by trench
Muzza wrote: ↑
January 16th, 2020, 7:30 am
Andy123 wrote: ↑
January 15th, 2020, 7:37 pm
killer wrote: ↑
January 15th, 2020, 7:10 pm
Yep very good ,it reminds me of when I was a Boy my Pop had some Cows ,most house holds did ,or some one in the street had them ,at that time ,Andy I had aJersey Cow that followed me every where ,raised her from a couple of days old anyway when she was About 2years Old ,pop must of taken her to a Bull as she got bigger & had a Calf ,which was a young Bull Calf ,so I played with him ,like I had done with his mother as a boy ,But I found out they the Bulls are crazy ,he attacked anyone he saw ,so we used to chain him up ,getting back to pigeons one of the things Pop did was use the first milk produced when gave birth to the pigeons ,mixed in there water ,never questioned. Why ,thinking about it must of been the Probiotics in it , the birds always looked good using it ,cheers
It would probably been because of the colostrum in the first milk. This is usually quite thick but as you say full of goodness and essential to the calf in the first few hours of birth to give it the antibodies against any bugs that may be around the farm or herd.
The channel Island bulls are very temperamental. I had Guernseys when I had my own herd. You always had to be weary of the bulls. In Cornwall we had Holsteins. I had one bull that I showed as a calf so he was halter trained. He was bred from an embryo imported from America and put into one of our own cows. As a 3 year old I had to move him from one yard to another down a road. By this time he was taller than me, and I’m 6ft 4in, and weighing nearly a ton. He hadn’t been on a halter since a calf. I put him in the crush and put the halter on him. I opened the front of the crush and he walked out. I walked him down the road like a puppy 🐢 😊
That would be because you are a good stockman, as much as anything, Andy. Born with it.

It reminds me of when we rented a house on a farm not long after remarrying. I was riding race horses in the mornings, and at a bit of a loose end all day.

The farm had a piggery on it, and one Sunday I found about 20 big pregnant sows wandering around outside my house. I quietly rounded them up and walked them back to the piggery, found an open gate, and figured that's where they had got out of. I put them back, and shut the gate.

Now, any farmer will tell you that herding pigs is like herding cats. :lol:, so when I told the farmer that I found a bunch of his pigs out, and hoped I had put them away in the right place, he was surprised!

Next thing, I am doing the odd bit here and there, moving sows, weaning piglets, and... working the boars. Soon I was the full time boar man.

I was in jockey trim, about 51 kilos, a big boar weighs what, 250 kilos? Most of them were pretty good. You never turned your back on one, or let one get you in a corner, but I had them going well. One old boar, who had lost his ear tag and was recorded as 'Black Pig', was enormous. Huge. He used to wander along with me just resting my hand on his back. :)

Except one. :twisted:

This pig was dangerous. He would eat you.

I used to feed him treats and scratch his back with a hard broom, and in the finish I could work him around the place without wasting half an hour trying to move him. One day I was at home and heard shouting from over at the farm. I scooted over and found the farmer bailed up, with a plywood board between him and the boar, who was foaming at the mouth and trying to get under the board. His wife was screaming, the farm hand was shouting, it was chaos!

I grabbed a scoop full of pig meal, jumped over the fence and stuck the scoop in the pig's mouth. The farmer jumped over the fence. Quickly! :lol:

The pig then followed me around to where was meant to go, like a lamb.

I must admit I was a bit less than polite about it. The bloke thought he was very clever. He was lucky he didn't get badly injured.

Stockmanship is a gift.
A great story Muzza, I di work with pigs when I was at agricultural college and I know they can be quite difficult to handle and you certainly don't want to get in the way of a full grown sow or boar at full pelt 😣😣😣 they are great creatures and full of character but will eat anything given the chance, the pig man at the college (who Andy might remember too) had 3 fingers missing on one had that had been bitten off by a boar when he was trying to separate him from a show. Like Andy its been mostly Cattle that have worked with and I loved my time as a herdsman. I still work with cattle on a beef farm and although I still love working with them and we get some real characters each year its not quite the same as I tend to get a bit too attached to some of them and the outcome for them is a sad one, but I try to give them the best life I can and they do taste good πŸ‘πŸ€  As you rightly say good stockmanship can't really be taught, you either have it or you don't. As I child I was actually petrified of cattle πŸ€”πŸ€£πŸ€£ we used to holiday every year on farms (which were cheap holidays back then) and when walking amongst the cattle (I was usually hiding behind the farmer πŸ˜‚πŸ€£) Andy always had a way with cattle and I remember they would always gather around him, they knew he could be trusted. Animals have a great sense when it comes to confidence in people, if you show no fear they generally stay calm and relaxed they are just inquisitive. Having said that you also need to be able to read and respect them (as you will know better than most having been a Jockey) as if you get too complacent you may well end up getting hurt.