Spoke to soon

Andy will post updates his updates here.
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Andy123
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May 8th, 2019, 9:45 am

Love your approach Murray. Great that you got 100% returns. What about flying them around home? Do you get them out on a daily basis? Mine are on open loft. I know this is something you couldn’t dream of doing but I do find that mine do get a bit wise to them. I don’t have much trouble directly around home but they are just starting to range and of course I have know idea or say in where they go and I think that they probably went into a hawks territory when ranging a couple of days ago. Something they need to do though.
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Muzza
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May 8th, 2019, 11:11 am

Andy123 wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 9:45 am
Love your approach Murray. Great that you got 100% returns. What about flying them around home? Do you get them out on a daily basis? Mine are on open loft. I know this is something you couldn’t dream of doing but I do find that mine do get a bit wise to them. I don’t have much trouble directly around home but they are just starting to range and of course I have know idea or say in where they go and I think that they probably went into a hawks territory when ranging a couple of days ago. Something they need to do though.

:) :D Take no notice of my 100% returns. It is just a bit of fun. Last year I missed the first two races as I spent a week in Singapore drinking the company's beer. The 'conference' as it is called.

So I had a week to top them off and pick a couple of cocks to send. I picked two, one veeery nearly won the race, the other one never arrived. :( :(

Next day he was there when I got home from work, a hawk had opened his neck up. When he drank, it ran out of his neck onto the ground. I was upset, this was beyond my skill set to fix. Another club member gave me what is called Surgical superglue. They use it in the hospitals, apparently. My wife held the bird, with her eyes screwed shut, while I pulled the edges of his crop together and ran the glue along the wound. In 5 seconds it set, and amazingly, it held!

A month or so latter, it was all healed up.
Last edited by Muzza on May 8th, 2019, 11:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
Regards,

Murray
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Muzza
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May 8th, 2019, 11:15 am

bold cock bird!
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Regards,

Murray
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Muzza
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May 8th, 2019, 11:22 am

After going through the moult, you would never know he had been injured.

Still undecided about racing him again. He isn't very well bred, so he would not be a huge loss, but you have to wonder if they are ok in the head after a serious injury like that?

It's not like he is the last pigeon in the loft. If he is scared he wont win, and he might as well not go.

I will see how he progresses
Regards,

Murray
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Muzza
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May 8th, 2019, 11:38 am

But, that same weekend, the dreaded Rotavirus hit my loft. I was more fortunate than many. I had a shed full of very unwell pigeons. But none ever looked like dying.

Many people had heavy losses.

So, that was my season over, almost before it began.

And yes, I had 100% returns in 2018!
Regards,

Murray
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Muzza
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May 8th, 2019, 12:02 pm

bkays wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 9:41 am
The problem with Peregrine's here. Is that we are a tiny island and yet the RSPB which is one of the biggest charities in the UK basically have a very well funded and active Peregrine breeding program.

They install many artificial breeding boxes every year across the UK. From inner city universities to countryside churches.

The last year I raced with my father. We let a batch of 16 go at Shepton Mallet. Had 3 Peregrine's go into them. We lost 6 that day. One was a blue hen who had raced two 500 mile channel races along with many other channel races.

If the RSPB let nature take its own course then Peregrine's wouldn't be a problem. We'd all only have the odd attack here and there.

Now training is an absolute minefield. Even letting them out can be a nightmare. Before the Patrick brothers moved house. They had to take their pigeons on a 30 mile toss everyday because they couldn't let them fly around the loft.

Yes, I recall reading about the Patrick brothers.

The raptors are doing what they do. No one can hold that against them.

But, when people keep breeding them and adding them to the wild population, it gets out of whack.

That is part of the problem here. There are thousands of falcons, but the erm, wildlife people keep breeding and feeding them.

Result? The hawks have eaten all the native fauna, and rely on racing pigeons.
Regards,

Murray
bkays
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May 8th, 2019, 12:14 pm

The raptors are doing what they do. No one can hold that against them.
True, they are natural hunters and very good at it, as we are. We are natural hunters too. However, if I was to be caught killing a sparrow hawk or peregrine I would be in court the next day and given a criminal record.

Another problem with the BOP is that they go after racing pigeons rather than the street pigeons. We have a colony of 30 odd streeters that go on the roof a few doors down from us and a few doors behind us. However, even with them around. The sparrow hawk would wait in the big tall tree in my neighbours garden waiting for mine to come down. It would wait for a good hour sometimes even though there were streeters in the garden two doors down eating from the bird feeders.

I'm positive they can spot and evaluate condition. They've definitely evolved to do that. I once had an ugly, not very nice white fantail join my pigeons and I saw the sparrow hawk around. I purposely fed this fantail on my pigeon trap everyday for 4 days. It would hang around for a few hours then fly off for the day. I was waiting all weekend for the sparrow hawk to attack.

Then my father and I was in the kitchen. The fantail was eating the corn I put down on the trap for it. Then we saw the sparrow hawk swoop towards it, at the last second or two change it's mind and fly off. I fed that fantail for another few days and nothing. As soon as I let mine out it hit one of my hens into the garden. Unlucky for the sparrow hawk it had an accident after it hit our hen and sadly died in the garden.

I felt so guilty for the fantail as it started to bring it's youngster with it :lol:. So I started feeding the youngster and his mother for awhile then after a few weeks they never came back again.
buster121
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May 8th, 2019, 1:41 pm

Muzza wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 11:15 am
bold cock bird!
he's a nice one mate
Eastyorkflyer
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May 8th, 2019, 2:26 pm

Muzza wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 12:02 pm
bkays wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 9:41 am
The problem with Peregrine's here. Is that we are a tiny island and yet the RSPB which is one of the biggest charities in the UK basically have a very well funded and active Peregrine breeding program.

They install many artificial breeding boxes every year across the UK. From inner city universities to countryside churches.

The last year I raced with my father. We let a batch of 16 go at Shepton Mallet. Had 3 Peregrine's go into them. We lost 6 that day. One was a blue hen who had raced two 500 mile channel races along with many other channel races.

If the RSPB let nature take its own course then Peregrine's wouldn't be a problem. We'd all only have the odd attack here and there.

Now training is an absolute minefield. Even letting them out can be a nightmare. Before the Patrick brothers moved house. They had to take their pigeons on a 30 mile toss everyday because they couldn't let them fly around the loft.

Yes, I recall reading about the Patrick brothers.

The raptors are doing what they do. No one can hold that against them.

But, when people keep breeding them and adding them to the wild population, it gets out of whack.

That is part of the problem here. There are thousands of falcons, but the erm, wildlife people keep breeding and feeding them.

Result? The hawks have eaten all the native fauna, and rely on racing pigeons.
Totally agree I witnessed three have accidental deaths last year!! but unfortunately lost my best yb to them first , haven't seen any in my area since hoping for a better year this year but I have woods on my property and we will constantly be fighting against them I suspect !
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