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Donski
(@donski)
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The birds have settled in great. Been looking into Worming/Cocci/Canker products.. Seen the 3 in 1 pills and also the stuff that you put in the water. Anyone have an opinion as to what is best to use? Bearing in mind I only have 6 pigeons currently. Any advice appreciated before I spend the £££ .. The birds have been vaccinated but not treated for the above as yet.
Cheers
Don

Snowfields Loft
(in the making) 😀


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Bryngwynt
(@bryngwynt)
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For what you have,I would use a tablet form.

I would test birds first to see if they need doing.Then if required treat as necessary.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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As Rich says tablets are probably you're best option with the amount of birds you currently have.
I used spot on last year and tablets this year and both seemed to make my birds sick (could just be coincidental) but I think in future I will be going back to single treatments if needed. Wormer in tablet, cocci and canker in the water. Have a look at Buster's meditech post you might find that useful.
All the best.


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Andy123
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I don’t treat for anything, apart from PMV which I have to vaccinate for.
I think if I was to treat I would treat for each separately. I must say that in my years of farming I never really found any of these combination ones particularly successful. I don’t know how you can expect to mix all the different treatments together and expect them not to counteract each other and reduce their worth.


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Donski
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Ok thanks.. I assumed it would be wise to treat them regularly... is there a reason for not doing so? How do you test the birds out of interest (and ignorance)... 🙂

Snowfields Loft
(in the making) 😀


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buster121
(@buster121)
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Ok thanks.. I assumed it would be wise to treat them regularly... is there a reason for not doing so? How do you test the birds out of interest (and ignorance)... 🙂

If you have a microscope and know what your looking for you can do yourself, but in the main folks tend to send away for testing to Deweedt (spelling) or similar places, Stokes in Stoke On Trent do them is another


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Andy123
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Ok thanks.. I assumed it would be wise to treat them regularly... is there a reason for not doing so? How do you test the birds out of interest (and ignorance)... 🙂

I just don’t like to treat anything and like them to build up their own immunity. I just use garlic and Apple Cider Vinegar in the water from time to time. I won’t treat a sick pigeon. They would be given a couple of days to recover, and if not are disposed of. I also don’t isolate a sick pigeon or stray pigeons. I’m not worried if they pass anything on, as my other birds, if it didn’t make them sick, would build up immunity to anything brought in. If it did make them sick I wouldn’t want them anyway. Having said all that I rarely have to dispose of any pigeons. I have never had to get rid of a good pigeon or had one go sick. I always think about the old saying “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger” lol. This is just my way of doing things and I know a lot of people won’t agree with me. I also would never knock anyone who does things differently. This is one of the great things with this sport, so many different ways and views.


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Trevor Hodges
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Ok thanks.. I assumed it would be wise to treat them regularly... is there a reason for not doing so? How do you test the birds out of interest (and ignorance)... 🙂

As Andy says there are many different ways of keeping pigeons healthy, it's just a matter of personal preference. Andy and I have both spent many years working with livestock as we were both dairy farmers and I still work on a cattle farm. I share Andy's views that achieving a good natural immune system is key, we can keep our birds and lofts disease free but once those birds are on the road they will come in contact with all sorts and without natural immunity could soon fall fowl. However many top fanciers do treat their birds religiously for these ailments so it's whatever you're preference is. I personally would treat my birds if they are unwell.


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ASKAMATE
(@askamate)
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I am with Andy on this I don't treat for anything & have been on the deep litter for years my birds are out in all weathers
drink the rain water but seem to do well with out the medication but it is up tp to the indevisual.


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Donski
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I hear you.. i've worked with livestock all my life so understand the whole immunity debate. I guess I am a little paranoid having lost half my stud of show rabbits to VHD despite them being vaccinated against the VHD 1 strain. We now have VHD 2 to contend with.
I probably will worm them and Coxi/Canker them (the pigeons) at some point but glad to hear they shouldn't die on me in the meantime. Glad to hear they are not so prone to these things as reading some articles would have you believe.
cheers
Don

Snowfields Loft
(in the making) 😀


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Andy123
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I hear you.. i've worked with livestock all my life so understand the whole immunity debate. I guess I am a little paranoid having lost half my stud of show rabbits to VHD despite them being vaccinated against the VHD 1 strain. We now have VHD 2 to contend with.
I probably will worm them and Coxi/Canker them (the pigeons) at some point but glad to hear they shouldn't die on me in the meantime. Glad to hear they are not so prone to these things as reading some articles would have you believe.
cheers
Don

Sorry to hear you lost a lot of your show rabbits Donski. Just as a matter of interest, did any of the half that survived show any signs of having the VHD disease? If so do you think that they would have now got a bit of immunity to it, and if not do you think they already had immunity to it?
We know that you can’t treat a virus, just the affects of it. Here I also think the problem with vaccinations is that it actually stops them from building up an immunity not only to the virus but also to the affects of it. Just my opinion though.


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Donski
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Yeah its interesting. VHD now usually referred to as RHD is pretty much a silent killer, particularly the first variant VHD1 which is the one I suffered with. The rabbits are acting normally, eating fine, and then just dead. The survivors didn't show any signs and have remained healthy so maybe a natural resistance was there.

I read also that the expected decimation of wild stocks, as expected, just didn't happen so there must have been a natural immunity for some. Vaccines do work and are tested for efficacy, the rabbit vaccines however do show a variance of success. I now vaccinate for RHD 1&2 but lost a rabbit recently after a show despite being vaccinated, as it showed no signs of illness I am suspecting it may have been an RHD loss. Post-mortem test results were vague so not really a help.

Although Rabbits can also suffer from Cocci and worms I have never treated for it and haven't for over 30 years without any ill effect.

Don

Snowfields Loft
(in the making) 😀


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Andy123
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Thanks for the reply Don. Always interesting to hear about these sort of things even if not directly pigeon related.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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Yeah its interesting. VHD now usually referred to as RHD is pretty much a silent killer, particularly the first variant VHD1 which is the one I suffered with. The rabbits are acting normally, eating fine, and then just dead. The survivors didn't show any signs and have remained healthy so maybe a natural resistance was there.

I read also that the expected decimation of wild stocks, as expected, just didn't happen so there must have been a natural immunity for some. Vaccines do work and are tested for efficacy, the rabbit vaccines however do show a variance of success. I now vaccinate for RHD 1&2 but lost a rabbit recently after a show despite being vaccinated, as it showed no signs of illness I am suspecting it may have been an RHD loss. Post-mortem test results were vague so not really a help.

Although Rabbits can also suffer from Cocci and worms I have never treated for it and haven't for over 30 years without any ill effect.

Don

Very interesting mate, I have just looked up RHD2 and it does look nasty. I can see why breeders want to vaccinate, I do agree that building a natural immunity into any livestock is important but to certain diseases this could take several generations and the question then is how many of our creatures are we prepared to lose in the process. This is when it comes down to good stockmanship and compassion for our pets when we decide what to treat against and what to leave to nature.
All the best.


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Donski
(@donski)
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Absolutely Mr. Trench. .. I think with the pigeons I will treat for cocci canker and worms.. but maybe leave it til the new year .. they have been vaccinated in August apparently. I know you have to do that to race them.

Snowfields Loft
(in the making) 😀


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