The Importance of the Intestinal Lining

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Murray
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As I said above, I am certain some of them have one too many races and give up.
When I was a jockey, especially many years ago when you were allowed to really hammer them, I rode some young horses in punishing finishes on heavy ground, and they would never try again.
Youngsters that have had a lot of training tosses and sent to the races every week, then had a bad fright with hawk or something, I believe they can just reach the point where they go, "Sod this".
Greetings from the land down under. :D
Blessed is he who expecteth nothing, for verily, he shall not be disappointed.
Buster121
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Murray wrote: Mon Jun 24, 2024 2:35 am As I said above, I am certain some of them have one too many races and give up.
When I was a jockey, especially many years ago when you were allowed to really hammer them, I rode some young horses in punishing finishes on heavy ground, and they would never try again.
Youngsters that have had a lot of training tosses and sent to the races every week, then had a bad fright with hawk or something, I believe they can just reach the point where they go, "Sod this".
Agree fully
Devo1956
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In all my time of breeding youngsters, there are stepping stones to the development of the youngsters. Some learn faster than others, the same as children. so every task you need to carry out. its carried out until the youngsters finish that task before they move on to the next one. Yes it takes time, but time well spent. If you want youngsters to race you have to train them, and not cut corners. For them to show their true ability.

What you have to remember, these are not just for racing as youngsters, these are your future yearlings and team racing pigeons of the future.
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king
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MIL wrote: Mon Jun 24, 2024 1:00 am I can accept that there are "racers" living in various Town Centres. Like you I've seen them knocking about on my travels throughout the UK (including York 2 weekends ago )

Question is why do they end up there?

Pigeons have an inbuilt homing instinct, so they know where home is
I'm sure pigeons have the ability to 'switch off' & 'switch on'. How many fanciers have had strays return to them when they have released them many miles away? Pigeons picked up in gardens often return to the same garden if taken away from that location. I've had strays return when liberated at a race point very close to where they are from only for them to return to me. It's like the bird 'fixes' a new location in its head, and only then resets to it's original home location when it's fit enough to make that journey to its home loft.
Maybe those birds living wild just fix a new location and don't or can't switch back?
I once bought in 6 YBS that were much too old. As I was putting them in the loft one bird flew out over my head, and away. The bird had been in the loft for just a few seconds. 2 years later the bird returned sporting a rubber!
Whilst fanciers have always lost birds, I believe the homing ability in our birds isn't as strong as it used to be. Many like to blame modern technology for the increased losses, but can't explain why only some birds are effected? Hawks are a huge problem, but the birds that are just scattered and not injured should still return as the birds that are often attacked and have injuries often get home.
NeilA
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MIL wrote: Mon Jun 24, 2024 12:06 am
king wrote: Sun Jun 23, 2024 12:36 pm
Whilst health may play a part in some, good pigeons go missing also. And a fancier has to be a little naive thinking that good birds that fail to return are all dead.
Health plays a major part in winning races, but not in homing ability. Street birds fly many miles and they will have health issues. Strays can be taken many miles yet return often in very good time despite not being 100% fit.

I'm a bit confused by this statement Dave.

So, lets say someone has a "good pigeon" and it goes missing. You're suggesting that not all those that are missing are dead.

Are you suggesting then that one day the pigeon just thinks "Ah sod it. I'm not going home I'm going to Bristol City Centre to live on scraps of chips instead"

I'm more inclined to think that good birds that don't return home are indeed the victim of "something" that has stopped them returning - whether it be BoP, wires, shooting etc..
Agree
I was 1-2-4-5 fed this year ( but only 3 positions count )
I sent them back the next week to the same race point 110 miles 1-5 fed didn’t return the first fed winner number 1 had been 2nd and 5th fed last year the other 1st 6th fed last year in 4 races he had
To me there dead they haven’t thought I don’t t fancy this anymore
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