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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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19/04/2020 9:21 pm  

Found this picture while going through some old photos today 👍🤠
-- attachment is not available --


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Andy123
(@andy123)
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19/04/2020 9:28 pm  

Nice one Trev. That’s me with some of my cows when I was herd manager at Lanhydrock in Cornwall.


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rainbow
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19/04/2020 9:42 pm  

great photo


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buster121
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19/04/2020 11:17 pm  

Happy memories I bet


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Andy123
(@andy123)
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19/04/2020 11:52 pm  

Happy memories I bet

They were good times mate. I think looking at it that is the shed that we had our top yielders and show cows in.
Unfortunately it was a common story where the son of the owner wanted to get involved more and moved down from London to try and run it.
We spent three quarters of a million on a very big expansion of the unit including a 60 point rotary parlour, which had already been started before the son moved down. I left before it was completed because of the son. The new unit was hardly used before the whole place was shut down. The whole lot is still there 16 years after I left but hasn’t been used for most of that time. The land is just rented out now with the buildings not being used. I did meet the farm manager, that was there when I was, a couple of years ago at the Royal Cornwall Show. He said that he had left shortly after me for the same reason.
It is such a shame as it was a great unit and I had a good team. We had become one of the top herds in the country in the 6 years I was there.


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Muzza
(@muzza)
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20/04/2020 11:20 am  

And that not the only time I have heard that story, Andy.

In the racing game, the 'Son and heir', has on many occasions ruined a racing stable. One I worked for springs to mind.

That is a strange sight for me, dairy cows living in a shed. In New Zealand, we were used to seeing big herds out on rotational grazing all year round. In recent years I believe that herds getting into four figures are common.

Regards

Murray.


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Andy123
(@andy123)
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20/04/2020 2:03 pm  

And that not the only time I have heard that story, Andy.

In the racing game, the 'Son and heir', has on many occasions ruined a racing stable. One I worked for springs to mind.

That is a strange sight for me, dairy cows living in a shed. In New Zealand, we were used to seeing big herds out on rotational grazing all year round. In recent years I believe that herds getting into four figures are common.

There are some farms over here that are on almost a New Zealand system, relying on grass. The yields on that system aren’t very high but neither are the over heads or feed costs. I personally preferred the opposite approach. Cows generally are milked twice a day, sometimes only once on the New Zealand system, and the average yields on the conventional system is 6,000 to 7,000 litres per lactation. I always wanted to get the full potential out of the cows and to have a top high yielding herd. Our cows down there were housed all year round. The feed was heavily reliant on maize silage and early first cut grass silage with added concentrates. This was all mixed in a feeder wagon so that every mouthful they ate was exactly the same nutritional value, maintains a stable acidity in the gut.The only difference would be the amount of mouthfuls they ate during the day depending on yield. We also milked 3 times a day to get the high yields. We had a herd of 500 cows and averaged over 10,000 litres per lactation.
Sorry to waffle on but I could talk for hours about the cows just as much as the pigeons 😂😂


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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20/04/2020 9:25 pm  

And that not the only time I have heard that story, Andy.

In the racing game, the 'Son and heir', has on many occasions ruined a racing stable. One I worked for springs to mind.

That is a strange sight for me, dairy cows living in a shed. In New Zealand, we were used to seeing big herds out on rotational grazing all year round. In recent years I believe that herds getting into four figures are common.

There is the old 3 generation saying, it takes one generation to build it, second generation to enjoy it, third generation loses it.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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20/04/2020 9:47 pm  

And that not the only time I have heard that story, Andy.

In the racing game, the 'Son and heir', has on many occasions ruined a racing stable. One I worked for springs to mind.

That is a strange sight for me, dairy cows living in a shed. In New Zealand, we were used to seeing big herds out on rotational grazing all year round. In recent years I believe that herds getting into four figures are common.

There are some farms over here that are on almost a New Zealand system, relying on grass. The yields on that system aren’t very high but neither are the over heads or feed costs. I personally preferred the opposite approach. Cows generally are milked twice a day, sometimes only once on the New Zealand system, and the average yields on the conventional system is 6,000 to 7,000 litres per lactation. I always wanted to get the full potential out of the cows and to have a top high yielding herd. Our cows down there were housed all year round. The feed was heavily reliant on maize silage and early first cut grass silage with added concentrates. This was all mixed in a feeder wagon so that every mouthful they ate was exactly the same nutritional value, maintains a stable acidity in the gut.The only difference would be the amount of mouthfuls they ate during the day depending on yield. We also milked 3 times a day to get the high yields. We had a herd of 500 cows and averaged over 10,000 litres per lactation.
Sorry to waffle on but I could talk for hours about the cows just as much as the pigeons 😂😂

I probably have a few more pictures like that Andy going back to your days at Stanhope farm 🤠👍 it was a great set up down at Lanhydrock even before they put the rotary parlour in.
As you say Andy quite a few farms have tried the New Zealand method but there are very few places in the UK it works due to our unpredictable climate/weather. Also the price dairy farmers are paid for their milk means the smaller yeilding herds just don't stand a chance, its all a numbers game these days. Friends of mine on the Isle of Wight set up a new dairy 5 years ago but had to close it down just before Christmas due to the money they were losing. To be honest most farming is the same, unless they have plenty of acres and large numbers of animals many farms can't even break even. The other thing I find sad is the longevity of the dairy cattle over hear, they are pushed so hard for yield that most of them are lucky to make 4 locations whereas the old traditional breeds would go on for 8 or more. Our farmers are held to ransom by the supermarkets/processors.


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Muzza
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20/04/2020 11:46 pm  

A Dutchman I met in New Zealand said he was amazed at how old many of the cows in the herd were, where he was working. Very old and still producing.

He said that in Holland 4 or 5 years was about it, because of the system they were worked under.

Regards

Murray.


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Andy123
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21/04/2020 12:27 am  

I must admit that to achieve the high yields the cows are pushed hard and are on a knife edge all the time. The culling was mainly done on fertility grounds where these high yielding cows failed to get back in calf or lameness. Having said that our top cows would produce as much milk in 3 lactations that the average cow would produce in 6 or 7. We still had some cows that were still going after 8 or 9 lactations.


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Potter29
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21/04/2020 9:14 am  

Nice pic mate , used to have holsteins on farm were i used to fly from , they was forever at fence wantin a stroke and just being nosey , they can get massive in size cant they but are relatively placid bar the odd one , same happend at this place aswell sons gt involved now farms derelict n grazing land been sold on , shame


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