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Lino flooring

 

Andy123
(@andy123)
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I thought I’d start a topic about my findings of using Lino/Vinyl as a floor covering. Giving my opinion and experience of using this as a floor covering. 

I had to do something to cover my wooden floor as parts of the ply flooring was breaking up a bit. I had considered just covering the floor with new ply. When I spoke about it on this forum lino was suggested as an option. 

My farther in law had some that they weren’t going to use so let me have it. 

It’s not quite big enough to cover the whole of the section I’m trying it in but not far off and it is in the section that will get most tested in. 

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So far it’s still looking promising. 

Firstly I would say that before laying the Lino down the flooring needs to be as clean as possible. Any little seed etc left under soon shows up. Although I must say that I probably didn’t and have found the odd bit under it. Having said that as I haven’t fixed it down it’s easy to lift and remove the offending object. This hasn’t caused any damage to the Lino. 

I then come on to the cleaning. The biggest worry has been the best way of scrapping and cleaning it without causing any damage. I knew that I couldn’t just scrape it like I would wood. I have though found it easy to clean. To start with I just went gently over it with the scraper in the worst places and then used a dustpan and brush. This worked well but had to be careful.

Before scrapping.

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After scrapping.

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At the weekend I brought a plastic scraper with a hard rubber edge that’s used for taking sweat and water off horses and something I had used myself when showing dairy cattle. 

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This seems to be working well. I’m just having to get used to a different technique of scrapping. 

This was the loft this evening before scrapping with the plastic scraper.

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And after. Just using the scraper and took me only two or three minutes. 

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Once a week I just give it a wash down with a damp cloth using warm water. 

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Will continue to let you know how I find it but am intending on get some more and fitting it into all sections. So far I like it and seems easy to maintain. The pigeons seem quite happy with it too. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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killer
(@killer)
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Great idea ,when they are not racing they can play checkers on it as well , {blue}:gape: lol


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Murray
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I had lino like that in my young bird loft. I liked it.

I used a plastic scraper on it too. Sometimes I would lift it and scrub it on the lawn and let it dry.

You can buy harder lino, like commercial grade. I wonder if that might be the go?

Regards

Murray.


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buster121
(@buster121)
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Looking great Andy and working well for you

Sadie's Loft's


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Murray
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Andy, those scrapers are ok, but for scraping down a racehorse after a race or a workout, we always used a piece of hoop iron or steel, about 30 inches long. Held one end in each hand, you can scrape a horse down very quickly. 

A lot of what is now just lore, or, "this is what we always have done", is in fact now being 'scientifically' proven.

After a race, or a very hard workout, a horse will be hosed all over, or washed with buckets and sponges. It will then be scraped, to remove the water and sweat from it's skin. There is some urgency in this, although no one could really explain why.

Now, it has been shown that after a race, obviously a horse's temperature will be elevated. Hosing or washing the horse will reduce the skin temperature, but unless that water is removed promptly, the the layer of water acts like a wet suit, stopping the cooling of the body.

I learned all this 50 years ago, when I was a tiny apprentice jockey. Only back then it wasn't explained to us. We were just yelled at. "Get that horse scraped down!" 

There you go. At 15 years of age, I knew what someone has written a thesis on, to get a university degree.

 

 

 

Regards

Murray.


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Andy123
(@andy123)
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Posted by: @murray

Andy, those scrapers are ok, but for scraping down a racehorse after a race or a workout, we always used a piece of hoop iron or steel, about 30 inches long. Held one end in each hand, you can scrape a horse down very quickly. 

A lot of what is now just lore, or, "this is what we always have done", is in fact now being 'scientifically' proven.

After a race, or a very hard workout, a horse will be hosed all over, or washed with buckets and sponges. It will then be scraped, to remove the water and sweat from it's skin. There is some urgency in this, although no one could really explain why.

Now, it has been shown that after a race, obviously a horse's temperature will be elevated. Hosing or washing the horse will reduce the skin temperature, but unless that water is removed promptly, the the layer of water acts like a wet suit, stopping the cooling of the body.

I learned all this 50 years ago, when I was a tiny apprentice jockey. Only back then it wasn't explained to us. We were just yelled at. "Get that horse scraped down!" 

There you go. At 15 years of age, I knew what someone has written a thesis on, to get a university degree.

 

 

 

I haven’t had a lot to do with horses. When down in Cornwall though I did show a lot of cattle. In the weeks leading up to the shows they were washed several times to remove dust and debris from the coat and skin. They were also clipped all over around a month before the show season. Every time they were washed with a shampoo and then rinsed off. We would then squeegee them down to remove excess water. From the initial halter training through to final preparation it took many hours of work on each animal before getting them into the show ring. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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Andy123
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So the Lino has been down since the 21st February. All going well so far. I scrape it over twice a day with the plastic scraper then just go over it with the brush. Once a week on a Sunday afternoon I scrape it over as usual and then with a bucket of hot water and a cloth I give it a good clean. Doesn’t actually take long. 

This is after just scraping and brushing before cleaning. 

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Then showing the difference between the half cleaned and the half not done. 

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Then when finished. 

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As can be seen it still looks good. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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Bryngwynt
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Looking like it’s doing a good job, massive difference between the wipe down and not.


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