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Murray
(@murray)
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How many times have we heard that?

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Yet, again, I have fallen for the idea that you can improve things, if you tweek the feed just a little bit.

My usual mix is equal parts of maize, safflower, sorghum, peas and wheat. I don't put sunflower, rape, linseed or any other bits and bobs in it. 

Why? because it costs money and they just flick it out on the floor. 

But we do want to give our pigeons the best start, so I caved in and put one extra part of peas in the mix. Extra protein, you know. 😉 

Well, what has happened is, I have thrown more feed in the rubbish bin than ever before. They are throwing the extra peas out along with half of the maize. ☹ 

What they are looking for is the safflower.

When you have a formula that works, why would you change it?

The question I am asking myself. 🤨  

I


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Andy123
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They know what they require. About the only thing mine are leaving is the peas. I would imagine they are getting plenty of protein from the rest of the seeds. I do like to give a few sunflower hearts and peanuts as a tit bit from time to time. They will eat these even if they have just been fed. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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Murray
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Today I made up 100 kg of my usual mix. 

No doubt many people will be able to tell me what is wrong with it. 

The pigeons can't read, and think it is terrific.

I didn't take much feed away tonight. 😀  

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devo56
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Some may say different things about feeding, but i have always bought quality feed with different seeds what is needed for the nutrition of the birds. For Growth, energy, and also for their feathering. Taking into account the season we are in, that was my way of dealing with feeding for good heath. Murray you know your birds, and i am sure they know you. Keep it up mate and reap the rewards.


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Buster121
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Posted by: @murray

Today I made up 100 kg of my usual mix. 

No doubt many people will be able to tell me what is wrong with it. 

The pigeons can't read, and think it is terrific.

I didn't take much feed away tonight. 😀  

How long will 100 kg last for

 

Sadie's Loft's, home of great birds, just a poor loft manager


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Murray
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I dunno, 5 weeks?

With the nest babies eating like horses they get through it, but once they are weaned it goes a fair way.

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chelsea2014uk
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@murray put a few hand fulls at a time youl see a differance as soon as a few stop eating wait till its all gone repeat


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Murray
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@chelsea2014uk, thank you for your advise. 

I must try that. 

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Murray
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Posted by: @andy123

They know what they require. About the only thing mine are leaving is the peas. I would imagine they are getting plenty of protein from the rest of the seeds. I do like to give a few sunflower hearts and peanuts as a tit bit from time to time. They will eat these even if they have just been fed. 

That was what I was finding, Andy. They were leaving the peas, and scattering the rest.

I have two pairs of stock birds fostering what should be the last outside youngsters for the year. I was worried. The babies were not growing as well as they should have been, the parents were not as keen on feeding them as you would like. 

Then I made a couple of bins of my regular mix, and put a big bowl of it in all the feed trays and nest boxes. 

There you go! 😉 👍 that's all they wanted. 

I went out just before and refilled the pots in the boxes with the babies in them. They are pumping this stuff into them as fast as I can put it in the bowls.

The famous Gordon is raising a big single youngster, and when I went to fill his feed bowl after dinner he went right off at me! If you have never been made to feel inadequate by a pigeon, it is an unusual experience.

There was only a little wheat and a few grains of maize left in his bowl. I put two scoops of mix in his bowl. He stood and glared at me, at eye level, until I put another scoop in. Then he let out a huff, and stalked off. 

I have been put in my place by a bloody pigeon.  

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Murray
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I have about 30 youngsters, some have been out flying for a couple of months, some are just getting on the wing, and 6 or 8 are just starting to venture out. I have had an extra portion of peas in the feed while the babies were growing. The pigeons have not been overly bothered about exercising, they just have a bit of a fly, a bath, and a potter around. That's good, they don't need to be tearing around getting hit by the hawks.

I have had them back on my lighter mix for a couple of days. The old birds were roaring around with some bigger youngsters. They landed on the roof and were playing around. Something made them jump and off they went! 

Old birds, young birds, little ones, the whole lot. 😮 It was quite a sight. At first the younger ones were going anti clockwise while the rest were going clockwise, but they soon joined on and away they went. The last of the young birds came down after 2 hours. 

All present and accounted for. 

It shows how quickly a change in the feed can affect them. A couple of days off the heavier feed, and they start feeling all keen and energetic. 

I think it shows that trying to load them up for a race a week before is pointless. It's the last couple of days that affect their energy levels. 

This post was modified 2 months ago by Murray

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Buster121
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Good to see all going ok mate, female hawk took one of my neighbours out bath couple days ago

Sadie's Loft's, home of great birds, just a poor loft manager


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killer
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Murray the reason may well be you are using first year dune peas ,which are higher in water content ,compared to Maple peas ,they both have around 22 % protein ,try cooking some in the oven to dry them out first ,cheers 


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Trevor Hodges
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Posted by: @murray

How many times have we heard that?

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Yet, again, I have fallen for the idea that you can improve things, if you tweek the feed just a little bit.

My usual mix is equal parts of maize, safflower, sorghum, peas and wheat. I don't put sunflower, rape, linseed or any other bits and bobs in it. 

Why? because it costs money and they just flick it out on the floor. 

But we do want to give our pigeons the best start, so I caved in and put one extra part of peas in the mix. Extra protein, you know. 😉 

Well, what has happened is, I have thrown more feed in the rubbish bin than ever before. They are throwing the extra peas out along with half of the maize. ☹ 

What they are looking for is the safflower.

When you have a formula that works, why would you change it?

The question I am asking myself. 🤨  

I find it's always the peas the birds leave if I over feed them, I do like to give my birds a small amount of linseed and rape seed in their mix as it's full of oils that are good for the feathering. 

I know what you are saying about the age old saying of if it ain't broke don't fix it but if you stand still you will never move forward so the odd tweek here and there is good as long as it's only small changes and the results are studied thoroughly and actually given the chance to prove success or failure. 


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Trevor Hodges
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Posted by: @chelsea2014uk

@murray put a few hand fulls at a time youl see a differance as soon as a few stop eating wait till its all gone repeat

Good advice Chelsea.

Hand feeding is definitely the most efficient way of feeding, many fanciers use barley in their mixes to use as a guide as to how much mix the birds want as they will start leaving the barley once they have had enough. The other sign when hand feeding is watching for the first bird to go for water as this also indicates that they have eaten enough. 


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Trevor Hodges
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Posted by: @murray

I have about 30 youngsters, some have been out flying for a couple of months, some are just getting on the wing, and 6 or 8 are just starting to venture out. I have had an extra portion of peas in the feed while the babies were growing. The pigeons have not been overly bothered about exercising, they just have a bit of a fly, a bath, and a potter around. That's good, they don't need to be tearing around getting hit by the hawks.

I have had them back on my lighter mix for a couple of days. The old birds were roaring around with some bigger youngsters. They landed on the roof and were playing around. Something made them jump and off they went! 

Old birds, young birds, little ones, the whole lot. 😮 It was quite a sight. At first the younger ones were going anti clockwise while the rest were going clockwise, but they soon joined on and away they went. The last of the young birds came down after 2 hours. 

All present and accounted for. 

It shows how quickly a change in the feed can affect them. A couple of days off the heavier feed, and they start feeling all keen and energetic. 

I think it shows that trying to load them up for a race a week before is pointless. It's the last couple of days that affect their energy levels. 

The trouble is with the long distance races is that what ever we feed in the loft completely goes out of the window unless we all feed exactly the same mix as they feed on the transporters. All we can do is make sure as youngsters they get what they need to ensure that the bone structure, muscle, heart/lung and feathers develop properly. 

Good to hear that this years crop is starting to come together nicely for you mate, I look forward to following their progress. 

This post was modified 2 months ago by Trevor Hodges

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