community

Forum

Notifications
Clear all

Health of the birds.

Page 1 / 2
 

devo56
(@devo56)
Member Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 8258
Topic starter  

Here is another bit of information for some members.

 

Pigeon Health: Look After Your Birds And They'll Look After You (racingpigeonsport.com)


Quote
Murray
(@murray)
Famed Member Registered
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 2896
 

I had a read of that, it was extremely interesting. 

I cant remember exactly when but a few years ago I had a look in my 'Medicine cupboard'. I had treatments for canker, cocci, respiratory disease, and some other antibiotics I had scored along the line.

All of them were years out of date. So, being a responsible person I did the correct thing and took them to a Vet and handed them in. 😊 

No, hang on, what I did was put them in a bag and bin them. 

I don't read those things very much. I know pigeons can sometimes get sick, and sometimes medication is good if prescribed by a vet, but I think that giving a list of things that are a good reason to buy drugs from an online seller?

No, I don't think that is a good idea. 

Not a good idea at all. 

I am good! They aren't firing rubber bullets at me. Yet.
Welcome to Victoria, 2021.


ReplyQuote
Murray
(@murray)
Famed Member Registered
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 2896
 
Posted by: @devo56

Here is another bit of information for some members.

 

Pigeon Health: Look After Your Birds And They'll Look After You (racingpigeonsport.com)

 

I am good! They aren't firing rubber bullets at me. Yet.
Welcome to Victoria, 2021.


ReplyQuote
devo56
(@devo56)
Member Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 8258
Topic starter  

@murray  Thank you for the reply Murray, the idea of posting these few few topics. Were for any new starters wanting to read. I understand that we all have different views on any subject on pigeon racing. So thank you for your view, also thank you for writing a reply.


ReplyQuote
Andy123
(@andy123)
Member Admin
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 12757
 

Some interesting information there George. The site was down all day and been out this evening so unable to reply. 

I must say though that I am of the same line as Murray. I don’t treat for anything and haven’t done over the years. If a pigeon gets sick it either recovers or is got rid of. The only thing I do is obviously vaccinate for PMV. 

You can’t bet a good natural immune system. 

The first thing I do when entering the loft is look the pigeons over to see if anything isn’t right. You will very quickly pick out any problem ones. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


ReplyQuote
devo56
(@devo56)
Member Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 8258
Topic starter  

@andy123  I must say from the word go, its all about you and your birds. For one i would not tell anyone how their loft should be run, But once again these tips are for new starters, its all about information that can help them.

This post was modified 4 days ago 2 times by devo56

ReplyQuote
Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
Member
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 11047
 

A good and informative post there Devo with plenty of useful information, as you say all we can do is to gather and give out information how people choose to use it down to them. I have tried many different approaches over the years both with and without chemical intervention and have to say neither have given conclusive evidence of which way is best. I never assume that my way is the only way and always respect other people's choices and methods, you will speak to top fliers who treat for absolutely everything and all most certainly just as many who use nothing, it's just down to finding a system that works for you and stick to it. The only thing I would add is that having worked with live stock for many years the things that are always treated for are worms, cocci and in some cases (calves) respiratory issues such as husk. 

 


ReplyQuote
Andy123
(@andy123)
Member Admin
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 12757
 
Posted by: @trench

A good and informative post there Devo with plenty of useful information, as you say all we can do is to gather and give out information how people choose to use it down to them. I have tried many different approaches over the years both with and without chemical intervention and have to say neither have given conclusive evidence of which way is best. I never assume that my way is the only way and always respect other people's choices and methods, you will speak to top fliers who treat for absolutely everything and all most certainly just as many who use nothing, it's just down to finding a system that works for you and stick to it. The only thing I would add is that having worked with live stock for many years the things that are always treated for are worms, cocci and in some cases (calves) respiratory issues such as husk. 

 

Trev I know you work more with beef animals but did you treat the dairy animals. Apart from treating the youngsters for husk and liver fluke I never treated them for anything routinely. Never treated for worms or cocci in the 25 years I was farming. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


ReplyQuote
Murray
(@murray)
Famed Member Registered
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 2896
 

I should add that while I have pigeons in my loft that are 5 generations without more than occasional worming, I would use medication immediately IF it was required. 

On the odd occasion, I see a pigeon that is off colour, I expect it is because they have eaten some rubbish when out in the garden. I don't panic if I see one pigeon which is not well for a day or two. Sometimes I don't feel well for a day or two, I don't need antibiotics to get better.

Sometimes the babies from eggs I fostered in or youngsters from another loft seem to be a bit vulnerable to wet nests and grow a little slower than my tough things. I still don't intervene. They have to develop an immune system. 

However, if all of a sudden I had a shed full of sick pigeons, I would be at the Vet in a moment. Fortunately, that hasn't happened. 

I am good! They aren't firing rubber bullets at me. Yet.
Welcome to Victoria, 2021.


ReplyQuote
devo56
(@devo56)
Member Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 8258
Topic starter  

Does anyone use this, i must say really good for the birds. You will see a big difference in your birds, after a couple of weeks.

mail (3)

 


ReplyQuote
Buster121
(@buster121)
Member Admin
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 23975
 
Posted by: @devo56

Does anyone use this, i must say really good for the birds. You will see a big difference in your birds, after a couple of weeks.

mail (3)

 

Not used here

 

Sadie's Loft's, home of great birds, just a poor loft manager


ReplyQuote
Andy123
(@andy123)
Member Admin
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 12757
 

Must say I’ve never seen it before. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


ReplyQuote
devo56
(@devo56)
Member Admin
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 8258
Topic starter  

@andy123  Yes Andy, its really great stuff. I think the sellers of this product is down south.


ReplyQuote
Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
Member
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 11047
 
Posted by: @andy123
Posted by: @trench

A good and informative post there Devo with plenty of useful information, as you say all we can do is to gather and give out information how people choose to use it down to them. I have tried many different approaches over the years both with and without chemical intervention and have to say neither have given conclusive evidence of which way is best. I never assume that my way is the only way and always respect other people's choices and methods, you will speak to top fliers who treat for absolutely everything and all most certainly just as many who use nothing, it's just down to finding a system that works for you and stick to it. The only thing I would add is that having worked with live stock for many years the things that are always treated for are worms, cocci and in some cases (calves) respiratory issues such as husk. 

 

Trev I know you work more with beef animals but did you treat the dairy animals. Apart from treating the youngsters for husk and liver fluke I never treated them for anything routinely. Never treated for worms or cocci in the 25 years I was farming. 

When I worked as a herdsman on the Isle of Wight Andy the calves were treated for cocci in their cake from 6 weeks old up to 20 weeks, they were given autoworm boluses at first turnout and were also given husk vac before first turnout. Liver fluke treatment was only treated given to our bulling heifers if required. Once in the milking herd the cows were only given fly repellent during the summer months and all other treatments i.e antibiotics etc were only administered if needed. Most beef and sheep farmers do worm annually. 


ReplyQuote
Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
Member
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 11047
 
Posted by: @devo56

Does anyone use this, i must say really good for the birds. You will see a big difference in your birds, after a couple of weeks.

mail (3)

 

Never seen that one Devo but I do give my birds Poultry spice on their feed. 


ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 2