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Andy123
(@andy123)
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I had another unrung squeaker in yesterday. That’s 2 in the last week. There must be someone around here somewhere that is breeding them. They know what a loft is and are quite tame so not feral’s.
Also today I had another stray in. This is a Blue Chequer hen with a GB 2001 ring on. Don’t know whether it’s someone’s lost stock bird but doesn’t look 18 years old 😀 😀 . Trouble is I doubt I will be able to report her or find out who she belongs to as rings over 10 years old have to be re-registered to be on record.


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bkays
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They don't smell chemically do they?


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Andy123
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They don't smell chemically do they?

No they don’t Ben.


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Murray
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I had another unrung squeaker in yesterday. That’s 2 in the last week. There must be someone around here somewhere that is breeding them. They know what a loft is and are quite tame so not feral’s.
Also today I had another stray in. This is a Blue Chequer hen with a GB 2001 ring on. Don’t know whether it’s someone’s lost stock bird but doesn’t look 18 years old 😀 😀 . Trouble is I doubt I will be able to report her or find out who she belongs to as rings over 10 years old have to be re-registered to be on record.

Then it's yours! You lucky thing. 🙂

Like me. I had a lovely slatey blue bar hen stray in a few months back. Got a lot of Van Loon about it. Has a Ballarat ring on it, so it is 100 miles from home.

In Oz, that is generally what is called a 'bad thing'. 😯 With the Rota virus epidemic, finding a stray in your loft can be the prelude to an outbreak of disease, and the loss of possibly most of your pigeons.

This little thing is a healthy as anything, fortunately, and has decided it likes living here. 😀 I contacted it's owner, a lovely Italian man, who promised, with some profanities, to come and get it.

Sooo, 😆 it has had the first couple of tosses with the rest, and is right on the drop.... 😆 😆

Regards

Murray.


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Trevor Hodges
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I have three unrung youngsters hanging around at the moment but thankfully they haven't yet come in. I would think if someone has used an old ring on a youngster they would have re registered it, I guess you can only try and report it and see what happens.


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Trevor Hodges
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I had another unrung squeaker in yesterday. That’s 2 in the last week. There must be someone around here somewhere that is breeding them. They know what a loft is and are quite tame so not feral’s.
Also today I had another stray in. This is a Blue Chequer hen with a GB 2001 ring on. Don’t know whether it’s someone’s lost stock bird but doesn’t look 18 years old 😀 😀 . Trouble is I doubt I will be able to report her or find out who she belongs to as rings over 10 years old have to be re-registered to be on record.

Then it's yours! You lucky thing. 🙂

Like me. I had a lovely slatey blue bar hen stray in a few months back. Got a lot of Van Loon about it. Has a Ballarat ring on it, so it is 100 miles from home.

In Oz, that is generally what is called a 'bad thing'. 😯 With the Rota virus epidemic, finding a stray in your loft can be the prelude to an outbreak of disease, and the loss of possibly most of your pigeons.

This little thing is a healthy as anything, fortunately, and has decided it likes living here. 😀 I contacted it's owner, a lovely Italian man, who promised, with some profanities, to come and get it.

Sooo, 😆 it has had the first couple of tosses with the rest, and is right on the drop.... 😆 😆

Might be worth hanging onto then mate, will he transfer it to you ??
I bet that Rota virus must be a constant worry to you !!!


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Murray
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People don't bother transferring pigeons here. "You can keep it" is about as about as close to a transfer as you will get. 😆

He has effectively abandoned it, so it is up to me to dispose of it. I will train it up with the others and see what happens.

Regards

Murray.


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Andy123
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So can you just race them without transferring them Murray?


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Murray
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Yea.

Honestly, no one cares.

A lot of blokes breed hundreds of pigeons every year. If they make a mistake, well they wipe their hands of them.

Regards

Murray.


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Trevor Hodges
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Yea.

Honestly, no one cares.

A lot of blokes breed hundreds of pigeons every year. If they make a mistake, well they wipe their hands of them.

I guess as long as all are happy then why not.


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Murray
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Having said that, on one occasion an old bloke drove half way across the state to collect a pigeon I had reported. Then he wanted to pay me for feeding it for a few days. So some people still do really care about their pigeons.

Unfortunately, another time I reported a Melbourne stray. Lovely little silver mealy, as a recall. It was pretty well flown out. The owner got back to me and arranged to have the bird picked up. I latter found out that the bloke who picked it up was a mate of his. He took it a few miles out in the bush and let it go. Hell, I could have done that... 😡 😡 😡

On another occasion I strayed one in from an early race. Poor little thing, didn't look big enough to be away from it's mother. And not in great condition. 🙁 I put it in a box and gave it a feed. I called the owner and got abused for feeding it!

One thing I do know is, I have never had one of mine reported. Make of that what you will.

The game is pretty tough over here, make no mistake.

Regards

Murray.


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Murray
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The racing season gets into swing, aaand , I had two strays arrive this afternoon.

One is a very nice blue yearling cock. Very healthy and in good order. But well lost, as it turns out.

After faffing around for an hour or so he flew into the loft through the door when I went in to take the feed out. Grabbed him, put him in a box in the garage.

Sent a text, saying he was here. Guess what. 👿

Regards

Murray.


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Trevor Hodges
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The racing season gets into swing, aaand , I had two strays arrive this afternoon.

One is a very nice blue yearling cock. Very healthy and in good order. But well lost, as it turns out.

After faffing around for an hour or so he flew into the loft through the door when I went in to take the feed out. Grabbed him, put him in a box in the garage.

Sent a text, saying he was here. Guess what. 👿

It is sad that so many fanciers care so little about these amazing creatures that we profess to love so much that they can't bothered to reply or to try and get their birds home, I understand that it's not always that simple but a bit of friendly communication and thanks is so easy these days.
Hope the new racing season is a good one for you all over there muzza, all the best.


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Murray
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I had a very nice blue bar cock turn up Saturday evening. Melbourne pigeon. He went straight into the loft, I picked him up, put him in a hamper with a feed and a drink, he was very hungry.

I reported him by text, got no response. So I reported him through the ring sec. of the Federation.

I got a call from a lovely Greek man, we shall call him Nick. Is very happy that I have the pigeon, he had been worried. We agree that I will keep the bird for a day, let him recover, then let him go.

So Monday morning at 7.45, as I left for work, I let him go. He circled for a while, then as I drove out of the Close, I saw him sitting on the roof. I thought, "This wont end well".

When I got home the pigeon is gone. It is a good 100 miles to his home, maybe a little more.

Nick called me. I tell him the pigeon is gone, has he arrived home? It hasn't. 🙁

This afternoon, I was out in the garden with my wife, watching the birds when I saw one that wasn't quite keeping up with the mob.. I said to Catherine, 'That's the blue stray I let go yesterday'. She was sceptical, how could I know that? 🙄 🙄 I told her it wasn't part of the mob, it was not in synch with them.

Sure enough, it is the same pigeon, only now, not only is he lost, he has been hit by a falcon. It is only a touch, I cleaned him up, he will be fine. I put him in the same hamper, with a feed and a drink, he was very hungry indeed!

So, I phoned Nick. The man was so pleased that the pigeon is safe that he immediately gifted it to me! 😀

Just what I need. A pigeon which got totally lost in it's first race, and has been hawked. We all need more of those. 😆

My wife overheard the conversation and just rolled her eyes! 🙄 🙄

Regards

Murray.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 10900
 

I had a very nice blue bar cock turn up Saturday evening. Melbourne pigeon. He went straight into the loft, I picked him up, put him in a hamper with a feed and a drink, he was very hungry.

I reported him by text, got no response. So I reported him through the ring sec. of the Federation.

I got a call from a lovely Greek man, we shall call him Nick. Is very happy that I have the pigeon, he had been worried. We agree that I will keep the bird for a day, let him recover, then let him go.

So Monday morning at 7.45, as I left for work, I let him go. He circled for a while, then as I drove out of the Close, I saw him sitting on the roof. I thought, "This wont end well".

When I got home the pigeon is gone. It is a good 100 miles to his home, maybe a little more.

Nick called me. I tell him the pigeon is gone, has he arrived home? It hasn't. 🙁

This afternoon, I was out in the garden with my wife, watching the birds when I saw one that wasn't quite keeping up with the mob.. I said to Catherine, 'That's the blue stray I let go yesterday'. She was sceptical, how could I know that? 🙄 🙄 I told her it wasn't part of the mob, it was not in synch with them.

Sure enough, it is the same pigeon, only now, not only is he lost, he has been hit by a falcon. It is only a touch, I cleaned him up, he will be fine. I put him in the same hamper, with a feed and a drink, he was very hungry indeed!

So, I phoned Nick. The man was so pleased that the pigeon is safe that he immediately gifted it to me! 😀

Just what I need. A pigeon which got totally lost in it's first race, and has been hawked. We all need more of those. 😆

My wife overheard the conversation and just rolled her eyes! 🙄 🙄

😆 😆
Great little tale Muzza, sounds like the bird was heading for home and had a lucky escape. It is amazing how we can lose our own birds so easily yet strays seem to settle so quickly. Like you our loft will end up full of waifs and strays as Lisa is animal mad and I am far too soft.
I had a nice Blue Chequer pied yearling cock bird in a few weeks back, it had a Scottish ring on but no wing stamp. He was rubbered as well as having a chip ring on so was possibly in an international race and if from Scotland was still a long way from home.
He was here for several weeks and on a number of occasions disappeared for day or two only return again until finally about two weeks ago he left us for good.
Sadly I didn't get round to reporting him through the Scottish union so don't know where he was from or who he belongs too but I like to think he found his way home.


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