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Magic
(@magic)
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I have stopped training the young birds because of family health issues and have noticed that they are spending more and more time in the garden picking at seeding grass and weed heads. As I do not feed greens I decided to sprout some barley to feed to the birds and followed These directions to the letter. One week later not one grain has sprouted for me from the 2 or 3 pounds soaked.
Anyone any ideas?

Children with autism are colourful - they are very beautiful and like the rainbow they stand out.


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Buster121
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When I used to do this with seed I used an old cloth/material thing wet it and placed seeds on then just left in shed

Sadie's Loft's, home of great birds, just a poor loft manager


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Potter29
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Must be old barley mate any good corn should show signs of sproutin within a week


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Trevor Hodges
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I would tend to agree with Potter, if the corn is any good it should have sprouted fine by now. Just out of interest mate what were the instructions ??
I wouldn't think barley needs any particularly special treatment. I only thing that I would say is that in agriculture it would usually be sown directly into the soil either in October for winter barley or December/January for spring barley so in much cooler and wetter conditions.
Best wishes to you and the family John, hope all are well again soon my friend.


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Andy123
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One of the differences is Trev that the sown Barley is seed Barley. Special treated to germinate. If the feed Barley has been over dried it would have killed the kernels and wonโ€™t sprout. Try a different Barley John.

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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Magic
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I would tend to agree with Potter, if the corn is any good it should have sprouted fine by now. Just out of interest mate what were the instructions ??

There were a few videos on youtube and this was the one I followed Trev.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=how+to+sprout+barley+seed&view=detail&mid=757855C6D796ADCEEBBF757855C6D796ADCEEBBF&FORM=VIRE

Children with autism are colourful - they are very beautiful and like the rainbow they stand out.


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Magic
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Thanks Buster, Potter and Andy for replying. You have answered the question I had been thinking but deliberately did not ask which is 'If the grain is dead for whatever reason be it age, over drying or being bombarded with microwaves ( which some are claiming) then is it of any value to the birds?
I have been reading up on and trying to understand the nutritional value between grass and hay (live and dead food stuffs) as it is the only thing I have found that might answer some of the questions I have about this subject prompted by the fact that my birds are spending more and more time in the garden picking at grass and weed seeding heads even though they are being hopper fed two different mixes so it is not hunger that is attracting them down but possibly something lacking in their diet.

Children with autism are colourful - they are very beautiful and like the rainbow they stand out.


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Potter29
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Try feeding them sum greens mate , dandelion leafs r a favorite of mine also cress n kale r good , atb


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Andy123
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Thanks Buster, Potter and Andy for replying. You have answered the question I had been thinking but deliberately did not ask which is 'If the grain is dead for whatever reason be it age, over drying or being bombarded with microwaves ( which some are claiming) then is it of any value to the birds?
I have been reading up on and trying to understand the nutritional value between grass and hay (live and dead food stuffs) as it is the only thing I have found that might answer some of the questions I have about this subject prompted by the fact that my birds are spending more and more time in the garden picking at grass and weed seeding heads even though they are being hopper fed two different mixes so it is not hunger that is attracting them down but possibly something lacking in their diet.

Could right you a long reply to Grass over Hay having been farming for years. Even this isnโ€™t straight forward though and dependant on my factors. ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜†

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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Trevor Hodges
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Thanks Buster, Potter and Andy for replying. You have answered the question I had been thinking but deliberately did not ask which is 'If the grain is dead for whatever reason be it age, over drying or being bombarded with microwaves ( which some are claiming) then is it of any value to the birds?
I have been reading up on and trying to understand the nutritional value between grass and hay (live and dead food stuffs) as it is the only thing I have found that might answer some of the questions I have about this subject prompted by the fact that my birds are spending more and more time in the garden picking at grass and weed seeding heads even though they are being hopper fed two different mixes so it is not hunger that is attracting them down but possibly something lacking in their diet.

As Andy says feed value of most grains/corn, grass, hay, silage etc will vary from year to year depending upon the weather. It's quite a complex topic and would take an age to try and explain fully even if I could ๐Ÿ˜†
For instance down here in the south this year grass silage and hay should be in high in sugar due to the sunshine we had early in the year but yields were down due to the lack of spring rain.
Corn/grains could also suffer this year due to dry conditions as the grains have ripened before the grains have really filled out. They are just combining the oil seed rape down here and the quality is poor as the seed has dried out too quickly so the essential oil content is low.
As far as the birds go I am a great believer that all creatures will eat what their bodies tell them they need. I don't think this always means they are lacking in their diet but if they find something tasteir or better then they will eat that in preference. Des Coulter's birds were always on open loft and kept on a basic diet and very natural, he was always happy to see them going down into the fields as he knew they would be looking for all they needed to keep them in top condition.


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Magic
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If the feed Barley has been over dried it would have killed the kernels and wonโ€™t sprout. Try a different Barley John.

Hi all,

ANDY With that being the case would it be preferable to feed the grains (not just barley) BEFORE they are treated. And what should I ask for up in this Agri Feed place as I was never given a choice?
I know my da when he bred the canaries 60 years ago and more would always check the germination value of the seed before feeding it to the birds.

POTTER Yeah, good idea. The reason I went down this road with the sprouted barley was the fact that the droppings, although fully formed went very soft and have to be scraped off the perches instead of just being brushed ever since the birds started to visit the garden. A garden in which there could be up to 3 dogs (including our own) using it on a near daily basis because the kids when they visit bring everything with them except the kitchen sink ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€

TREV. I posted the link to the video on soaking, did you see it and what do you think?

BUSTER Yeah if only life was that simple now my friend. Look at all the illnesses the pigeon world world has to contend with now since the introduction of all these new fangled "treated" foodstuffs.

Children with autism are colourful - they are very beautiful and like the rainbow they stand out.


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Potter29
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Magic ide still try it as i do no that many fanciers do feed sprouting seeds to there birds i have tried it myself but they wasnt overly keen , atb


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Andy123
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If your wanting to sprout it I would see if you can obtain some off the field before being dried at all. My figures may be wrong as I was a dairy farmer and not arable but it will be around what Iโ€™m saying.
I think it will be harvested at around 20% moisture content. Much drier and the grain could be shattered by the Combine. After being combined it will by dried to below 13.5% moisture. If dried too much this is when the kernels will be killed. Malting Barley will be stored at a higher moisture content as it is required to sprout during fermentation and be softer. This wouldnโ€™t be stored very long before use. Barley that is intended for feeding, usually crushed or rolled, almost turns into a flour so needs to be much drier. This Barley is very unlikely to germinate. This will also then usually be treated with insecticide to prevent weevils.
So in answer to your question John I would either be looking at getting a malting Barley or some off the field before being dried.

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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If the feed Barley has been over dried it would have killed the kernels and wonโ€™t sprout. Try a different Barley John.

Hi all,

ANDY With that being the case would it be preferable to feed the grains (not just barley) BEFORE they are treated. And what should I ask for up in this Agri Feed place as I was never given a choice?
I know my da when he bred the canaries 60 years ago and more would always check the germination value of the seed before feeding it to the birds.

POTTER Yeah, good idea. The reason I went down this road with the sprouted barley was the fact that the droppings, although fully formed went very soft and have to be scraped off the perches instead of just being brushed ever since the birds started to visit the garden. A garden in which there could be up to 3 dogs (including our own) using it on a near daily basis because the kids when they visit bring everything with them except the kitchen sink ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€

TREV. I posted the link to the video on soaking, did you see it and what do you think?

BUSTER Yeah if only life was that simple now my friend. Look at all the illnesses the pigeon world world has to contend with now since the introduction of all these new fangled "treated" foodstuffs.

Yes John I did look at the link, it seems a bit of a faff to me but otherwise you wouldn't think it could go wrong if the grains are good. Funny thing is you leave any corn in a damp corner of a bin or shed and it will be sprouting in no time, I would think you were just very unlucky. ๐Ÿ˜€


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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Posts: 10963
 

If your wanting to sprout it I would see if you can obtain some off the field before being dried at all. My figures may be wrong as I was a dairy farmer and not arable but it will be around what Iโ€™m saying.
I think it will be harvested at around 20% moisture content. Much drier and the grain could be shattered by the Combine. After being combined it will by dried to below 13.5% moisture. If dried too much this is when the kernels will be killed. Malting Barley will be stored at a higher moisture content as it is required to sprout during fermentation and be softer. This wouldnโ€™t be stored very long before use. Barley that is intended for feeding, usually crushed or rolled, almost turns into a flour so needs to be much drier. This Barley is very unlikely to germinate. This will also then usually be treated with insecticide to prevent weevils.
So in answer to your question John I would either be looking at getting a malting Barley or some off the field before being dried.

You are right Andy but they combine now at around 16% or the farmer get penalised due to drying costs at the mill ๐Ÿ˜• ๐Ÿ˜• They do however treat the grains that will be used as seed corn without any further drying.


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