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devo56
(@devo56)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7730
16/02/2017 9:39 pm  

Just a bit of a read for some members. http://www.drjohnlamberton.com/journey-imprinting.htm


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 9626
16/02/2017 10:30 pm  

Very good read that Dev, a lot of very important information there for novices to take on board and some of us old hands to remember.
We need to take the time to get to know our babies and for them to get to know us. Unfortunately with early breeding due to bad weather, cold days and a lack of day light many of us just won't or can't spend long enough in the loft. Especially those of us without lighting or heating and being at work during most of the day light hours.
Cheers, fella.


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Andy123
(@andy123)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 9394
16/02/2017 11:45 pm  

A very interesting read Devo, thanks for that mate. Some very good points made there. I always used to hand feed my youngsters, and will do again this year. I also make a point of picking every youngster up every day, even if just picked up and put back down again.


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Muzza
(@muzza)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1370
22/07/2019 11:51 am  

That is a very good article.

I read it on Dr Lamberton's website quite a long time ago.

It uses a few terms which many of us will be unfamiliar with, but in my less scientific words, it ain't rocket science.

From when they were just little bubbies wobbling around in the nest box, my pigeons have known that the boss comes into the loft at daybreak, picks up the droppings and goes away. A short time latter he comes back and gives us our breakfast!

This happens again in the afternoon. It never varies. Except in the middle of winter. On Sunday, it might be 7.30 before I make a coffee and put my woolly hat on... Smile

So, they all know the rules, and, as Dr Lamberton says, they are imprinted.

The days are starting to get longer down under, the birds are starting to feel the stirrings of spring, and flew like lunatics for two 15 minute spells this afternoon. Grin But when the boss turned up with feed and called, they were all in before I had finished putting the feed in.

Regards

Murray.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 9626
22/07/2019 11:52 pm  

That is a very good article.

I read it on Dr Lamberton's website quite a long time ago.

It uses a few terms which many of us will be unfamiliar with, but in my less scientific words, it ain't rocket science.

From when they were just little bubbies wobbling around in the nest box, my pigeons have known that the boss comes into the loft at daybreak, picks up the droppings and goes away. A short time latter he comes back and gives us our breakfast!

This happens again in the afternoon. It never varies. Except in the middle of winter. On Sunday, it might be 7.30 before I make a coffee and put my woolly hat on... Smile

So, they all know the rules, and, as Dr Lamberton says, they are imprinted.

The days are starting to get longer down under, the birds are starting to feel the stirrings of spring, and flew like lunatics for two 15 minute spells this afternoon. Grin But when the boss turned up with feed and called, they were all in before I had finished putting the feed in.

Very true Murray, good to hear the birds are getting that spring feeling mate Grin I do think it is possible to change their habits though at any age,
at least I hope it is or I'm in trouble LoL LoL I usually leave food infront of my birds all day especially while feeding youngsters, after having had such a problem getting them in on Saturday I have changed the feeding regime and already can see a difference in their trapping. Just have to wait and see what happens next weekend now Grin


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