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Andy123
(@andy123)
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The garlic will help but probably just getting over the virus. Hopefully they will be fine now and built up an immunity to what ever it was. 

Its a shame about the youngsters but hopefully you will be able to rear them.


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Murray
(@murray)
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Mizmo, this will sound awfully harsh, and it isn't mean to be, but no, you wont hand raise the babies. 

You need to let a healthy family develop in your loft. You wont do that if you intervene and hand feed babies.

Just in case you think I am just a heartless pigeon racing bloke, this is the first pigeon I had after we moved to Australia from New Zealand. 

I raised him by hand, after 10 years I still have him. 

 

Pigeon 001

Regards

Murray.


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Murray
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What I am saying is, you cant keep rescuing them. 

Then you start using medications to keep them healthy.

When they go to the races, they fall at the first hurdle, because the natural selection has been avoided.

 

Regards

Murray.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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Posted by: @muzza

What I am saying is, you cant keep rescuing them. 

Then you start using medications to keep them healthy.

When they go to the races, they fall at the first hurdle, because the natural selection has been avoided.

 

Very true Muzza, as harsh as it might you have to let nature take its course. 


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Trevor Hodges
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Posted by: @muzza

Mizmo, this will sound awfully harsh, and it isn't mean to be, but no, you wont hand raise the babies. 

You need to let a healthy family develop in your loft. You wont do that if you intervene and hand feed babies.

Just in case you think I am just a heartless pigeon racing bloke, this is the first pigeon I had after we moved to Australia from New Zealand. 

I raised him by hand, after 10 years I still have him. 

 

Pigeon 001

Great picture mate 👍🤠


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Andy123
(@andy123)
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I do think far too many people treat for anything nowadays. As most know I don’t treat for anything and rely on building immunity. 


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Mizmo
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The youngster both died because the parents didnt keep them warm enough. So for future reference I wont let them breed again. I guess you're right in regards to hand rearing them,plus it's too much Time and effort. 

The older bird that died was a pair with a chick do you think the hen will rear that on her own ?

Seems like the illness has calmed down . (Maybe it has something to do with the mineral or oyster shells ,as I had stopped giving them)


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Murray
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Very sad to hear that the youngsters died. But something is/was wrong in your loft. 

Pigeons are the ultimate survivors. They will eat anything and raise young anywhere. During the dark days of the blitz, pigeons were still being born in London.

Don't give up. 

If you are having health problems it is almost always something wrong with the loft. Drafts, damp, rodents, big temperature variations, contaminated water, etc. It is up to you to work through it and find the source. 

I bought 30 life rings this year. I have used 27 and I have 2 put aside for a "secret pair" of eggs I have fostered under a pair. Apart from one broken egg, I have 100% fertility. My loft has been shown on here, it is just a shed, and I never use any medications. 

Pigeons in a healthy, happy environment, breed like flies. 

If not, you have a problem to solve. Suspicious  

Regards

Murray.


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Andy123
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I agree with Murray.

I wouldn’t necessarily give up on the pair that stopped sitting on the youngsters. Either they themselves weren’t well and couldn’t look after them or they knew the youngsters weren’t right. With the problem you have had it was always going to be very difficult to rear any youngsters. If the parents have got any sort of virus they will pass it on to their youngsters, who at their young age would have no immune system to fight it and more than likely to die from it.

I would wait now until all are fit and well again before trying to breed any more. If all Well you shouldn’t ever have to intervene with the rearing of any youngsters. 

The hen that is feeding a youngster on her own may continue to rear it alone. This isn’t the best time of the year for rearing, they aren’t as keen at this time. 


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Trevor Hodges
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Posted by: @mizmo

The youngster both died because the parents didnt keep them warm enough. So for future reference I wont let them breed again. I guess you're right in regards to hand rearing them,plus it's too much Time and effort. 

The older bird that died was a pair with a chick do you think the hen will rear that on her own ?

Seems like the illness has calmed down . (Maybe it has something to do with the mineral or oyster shells ,as I had stopped giving them)

Sorry to hear the youngsters died mate it is horrible but unfortunately they were probably going to die anyway which is why the parents stopped caring for them properly, nature will do some cruel things but sick/weak young of any kind will usually be left to die by their parents.

As Andy says the hen on her own should still rear the youngster ok, as Andy says its not the best time of year for rearing youngsters as there is little or no sunshine and it's cold, there is a reason why in nature most animals and birds breed in the spring. Having said that of course many fanciers do start breeding in late November early December these days as rings are available so much earlier. 

Sound advice from Muzza and Andy as always. 

Hope the rest of the birds recover well mate. 

This post was modified 5 months ago by Trevor Hodges

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Andy123
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@trench I might be wrong but I would imagine most people looking to breed early, probably already paired up, have lights on and possibly even heating in the loft. 


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Trevor Hodges
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Posted by: @andy123

@trench I might be wrong but I would imagine most people looking to breed early, probably already paired up, have lights on and possibly even heating in the loft. 

You are probably right Andy, makes the darkness system easier too I would imagine 👍🤠


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Mizmo
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Topic starter  

I dont think I have any draft in the loft as I have covered up the holes seeing as the cold months are upon us. As for dampness I cant see none wither .I has a little leak from where the rain was getting through the window .but I sorted that out . All seems to be well for  now. 

Also I have noticed a hole in the garden I'm guessing it must be rats . We do have squirrels coming and going but they dont burrow, do they? 

What can I lure the rats with .as I have a cage to trap it.

 

Also is there anyway to heat the loft with a portable device ?


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Andy123
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Good to hear things are better. 

Rats generally have a run/path that they follow usually beside a building. Put poison down the hole and the trap beside a building. Cover it over with a bit of board or pipe. 

Unless you are serious about breeding early I wouldn’t worry about heating the loft. Your birds won’t suffer from the cold. You just need to de-ice the drinkers if it gets that cold. I don’t think there is any safe way of heating a loft without electric. Then you could use bar heaters. I’ve never heated any of mine. 


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Murray
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Posted by: @mizmo

I dont think I have any draft in the loft as I have covered up the holes seeing as the cold months are upon us. As for dampness I cant see none wither .I has a little leak from where the rain was getting through the window .but I sorted that out . All seems to be well for  now. 

Also I have noticed a hole in the garden I'm guessing it must be rats . We do have squirrels coming and going but they dont burrow, do they? 

What can I lure the rats with .as I have a cage to trap it.

 

Also is there anyway to heat the loft with a portable device ?

Good to see that you are really thinking about this, Mizmo. 

There is confusion between the terms wet and damp. 

If the rain drives in, gets under the door or in through a trap, you will have a wet floor. Not ideal, but if your ventilation is good, within a day it will all be nice and dry. That is wet. 

Damp is a different thing. If your loft feels cold and clammy, the perches and floor are sticky, the droppings are not nice and round, and you have pigeons with dirty feet, your loft is damp. 

That will not go away until you fix it. Often it is caused by condensation from the breaths of too many pigeons in an enclosed space. Which means your ventilation is faulty or you have too many pigeons. 

It is a mine field.  Happy  

Regards

Murray.


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