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National racing

 

Andy123
(@andy123)
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A post on pigeon chat got me thinking.

The question was is there a difference between Federation pigeons and National pigeons. From the few replies the general census was yes. What people were saying was that pigeons in federation races have to leave the liberation site quickly with the first batches. Then keep with the front runners until close to home before breaking to their own lofts.

It does make a difference to which part of the country you live but generally the National pigeon needs to be more of an individual, unafraid to head off on their own or with just a small bunch going in the same direction. This decision has to be made almost from the start of the race so probably need more time to sort out their line before leaving the liberation site. If they get in the wrong batch they could soon be many miles off line. 

I think the National pigeon is a different sort of pigeon.

As most know I only race in Nationals. So right from their first race they have to think for themselves. 

My question is with this in mind would you think that giving National pigeons Federation races before hand be detrimental to them. Would this give them the wrong experience and encourage them to leave the site quickly with the first batches regardless of what way they were going? The losses in National racing is always going to be higher than in Federation races because of them going much further off line. A 150 mile race for my birds can easily become a 300 mile one if they go with pigeons going over to the East of the country. 

Home of the ukpigeonracing test loft.


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devo56
(@devo56)
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To be honest Andy, i feel you have to chose the distance you are going to fly to. Then it makes no difference what levels you race at. Its all about the right birds to perform for you at that distance, feeding for whatever distance. Its all about your birds taking into account, Feeding, training, and your loft management. Its all about distance of different levels. does it really matter if you have the tools to deal with it.


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George & Morgan
(@george-morgan)
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think your bird needs more single up tosses as far as a hundred mls 


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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From any race long or short it's the bird in front that wins. I agree with George and Devo, I don't think from the distance the pigeon type is any different it's the preparation for the job in hand that makes the difference. Obviously you need to have birds that can compete at the distance and the weather conditions will always play a part. I personally still think using federation races is good and essential training for the national races and you will find most successful distance fliers compete in federation/club racing of some description. I also agree with George and think single up training from an early age is important and I think the birds need training from all directions. 


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devo56
(@devo56)
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A very good mate of mine, was a really good distance flyer. He had Dutch Janssens from very good lines, He would drive from Wigan to Telford, he took a flask of tea and sandwiches and would park up in a lay by. Every 30 minutes he would release a bird, he always said its the only way to train distance birds.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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Posted by: @devo56

A very good mate of mine, was a really good distance flyer. He had Dutch Janssens from very good lines, He would drive from Wigan to Telford, he took a flask of tea and sandwiches and would park up in a lay by. Every 30 minutes he would release a bird, he always said its the only way to train distance birds.

I know it was always Des Coulters way, he would start training his babies almost as soon as they were flying out, he would take them in which ever direction he (or anyone who could take them) was travelling in and as soon as he could he would start singling them up. He would always race his youngsters inland with the club but wasn't in a hurry to get them over the water, as yearlings they would have a couple of inland races before going over the water, once they had been over the water they never raced inland again. His old birds weren't raced hard they usually had one or two short warm up races then straight in go their target race, infact his 1st Open National 160th International San Sebastian hen "Champion Clio" only had one trainer from hove on the morning of basketing. This hen flew the complete youngbird race programme from Chichester to Wadebridge but never went over the water, as a yearling she was on the day from Bergerac. His birds were always on an open loft rain or shine and he would train right through the winter. 

Some might find this clip interesting. 

https://www.elimarpigeons.com/articles/index.php/articles/scribes/keith-mott/1235-coulter14


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devo56
(@devo56)
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@trench  Another great flyer you always spoke highly of Des, Trench great flyers like that dont just come around that easy. Also i remember you getting gift birds from him.


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Trevor Hodges
(@trench)
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Posted by: @devo56

@trench  Another great flyer you always spoke highly of Des, Trench great flyers like that dont just come around that easy. Also i remember you getting gift birds from him.

He is a great pigeon man/stockman and a good friend, yes I am fortunate enough to have some of his birds in my loft and several members of the Littlehampton club also have birds bred down from the Coulter family. The trouble is mate as the saying goes "You can buy the winning fancier's pigeons but you can't buy the fancier" how very true is that 👍🤠😉


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