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Autumn into Winter

 

Andy123
(@andy123)
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Following on from a post by our Aussie friend Murray about spring being well on it’s way down under the opposite is the case over here. As we are now going into autumn we have lots of things to consider with our birds. My routine will have to change soon. The days are really starting to draw in now. It is dark by 8pm now. Come the end of October and the clocks change it will be nearly dark by the time I finish work so will have to start just doing the birds in the mornings. 

By this time most of the moult would have finished and we need to go through the birds to see how many cocks and hens we have. We then have to decide what our aims are for the following year. I think you need to look at your records to evaluate the birds. Look at the breeding and racing performances of each bird as a selection guide. I would advise against looking and handling the pigeons to evaluate them as after the moult even the poorer pigeons can look and feel great. But having said that I would check that they have come through the moult well, any that haven’t or have struggled should have a big ? against them. 

The birds will be split up at some point during the winter before being repaired. 

Murray said that he has 5 very early bred youngsters for over there. You say they have this seasons rings on Murray, what does that mean?  Over here the 2022 rings will be available for issue during the first week of December, which I personally think is ridiculous. That means that some people will be pairing up at the end of October, before the start of winter. I won’t be until late February/March. This is the end of our winter beginning of spring. 

The winter months are very important for us to prepare things for the coming season. This is a 365 days a year sport. 

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George & Morgan
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good read Andy however i think a fancier must take a look at him/herself were the pairings correct was there management  right before blaming there birds one other point which i have said before when i was a kid in the 50s dad would take me with him to the auctions on a Saturday night fanciers would walk past unflown/raced  birds it was very difficult to sell them i believe the olr bird win or lose is a genuine bird and are good value to buy in there auction what would be good to read is how do members decide  the ability of there birds in the hand  not the basket or pedigree i look at the colour of the eye not eye sign then the knuckle on the wing sorry if none of this makes sense it's a age thing lol 


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Andy123
(@andy123)
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Posted by: @george-morgan

good read Andy however i think a fancier must take a look at him/herself were the pairings correct was there management  right before blaming there birds one other point which i have said before when i was a kid in the 50s dad would take me with him to the auctions on a Saturday night fanciers would walk past unflown/raced  birds it was very difficult to sell them i believe the olr bird win or lose is a genuine bird and are good value to buy in there auction what would be good to read is how do members decide  the ability of there birds in the hand  not the basket or pedigree i look at the colour of the eye not eye sign then the knuckle on the wing sorry if none of this makes sense it's a age thing lol 

I agree with you George that we must be continually taking a look at our methods. At this stage for me with the birds not being raced much but the races they have are all National races and at a good distance so any that are here at the end of the season stay. In time I may have to be harder on what I’m going to keep each year.  

As far as the handling goes good pigeons come in all shapes and sizes and a lot is the fanciers preference. I had a nest pair of 2 hens back in 1989 that were very small and not much to handle but they both won a few races. I like birds that sit comfortably in my hand, I have quite big hands so probably prefer bigger pigeons than some, they want to feel well balanced with good silky feathers, tight in the vent and not too deep in the keel. 

Although I can see your thinking about OLR birds I don’t know that I fully agree. Yes these pigeons left after the final have come through a gruelling amount of training and racing so they must have something. But how often do the good young birds make good old birds. In my experience very rarely do the best youngsters turn out to be very good old birds. I take as an example, only because you can find the results easily and I don’t want to single anyone of them out, the RPRA OLR. This year they had a yearling OLR made up from the youngsters left from last year that members wished to leave at the lofts for this. These birds would all have gone through the training and racing as youngsters the previous year. 215 yearlings were entered. The final race was at 334 miles and they sent 108 of the 215 that were still there at the final. Only 22 birds returned. 

You also need to consider what distance you are aiming at. Good distance birds tend to mature slower and won’t show their real value until sent over 400+ miles and will continue with only having a few races each year for 6+ years. Sprint pigeons on the other hand would have to show their value as yearlings as they are generally finished by the time their 3 years old. 

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Murray
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Andy the horses and pigeons have a birthday in the first of August, and the rings are available about then.

These little tackers are September bred, so they are early enough. 

In NZ I used to have them hatching the last week in July, to put the rings on on the first of August. I am not going to start pairing up most of them for another couple of weeks.

I am good! They aren't firing rubber bullets at me. Yet.
Welcome to Victoria, 2021.


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Andy123
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Posted by: @murray

Andy the horses and pigeons have a birthday in the first of August, and the rings are available about then.

These little tackers are September bred, so they are early enough. 

In NZ I used to have them hatching the last week in July, to put the rings on on the first of August. I am not going to start pairing up most of them for another couple of weeks.

So does that mean that your 2021 rings aren’t issued until the first of August and any that are bred earlier, if any, would have to have 2020 rings on? 

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George & Morgan
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one thing i don't like Andy is a long cast bird always seem to breed one each year  and there is no way will it stay


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Murray
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@andy123,  Yep. The 2021 youngsters will be bred from now on. Babies born up to 31st of July next year will be 2021 rung. 

Lots of blokes breed a heap after the new year so they are young birds when the racing starts, because they don't want the hassle of managing mature cocks. 

I am good! They aren't firing rubber bullets at me. Yet.
Welcome to Victoria, 2021.


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