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Modern day pigeons

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chrisg2
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Posted by: @killer

I can remember pigeons of yesteryear going back 70 years ,the cocks had bigger  heads as well as the hens ,they could Fly allday & get up & come latter the next day ,they could fly head winds ,if attracted by the falcon would stay together in a tight mob ,out climb over the falcon & work there way out of trouble ,they may have been a little touchy on the home end ,but were more reliable over the distance , yes they have got faster know ,but I still loved the older breeds , 

I think that is more down to the feed which was more robust, no fancy hot small seeds which help to cause dehydration in my opinion, plus they were not trained to within an inch of their lives like many today, more content in their surroundings not having to look out for the ham fisted owner grabbing them and chucking them into a basket.

Its the fanciers that have the bigger heads now but smaller brains inside. {blue}:laughingoutloud:  


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Andy123
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Some good thoughts and replies. A lot I agree with.

Here are my thoughts. 

I don’t think pigeons are any better or even much faster than years ago.  Velocities show that generally they aren’t any faster. 

The old families have generally been replaced, but that is how it should be. The families of today have been bred down from the old families. I do think that pigeons should be known by the name of their breeders and not by the name of a breeder many generations ago. No two lofts have the same genetics in their loft if their inmates have been bred there. In my view to much emphasis is put on strain names. I am quite happy to have a mixture of pigeons from people that I can then blend into a family.

I think the biggest change nowadays from days gone bye is the management of the pigeons, as has already been mentioned. Not all for the benefit of our pigeons. The feeding is different and the amount of medication and supplements used have very much increased. I don’t think that a lot of pigeons have the immunity and robustness of those from the past. 

There is much more emphasis on sprint/middle distance racing now and not many fanciers wanting to send to the long distance events. Back years ago the longest race was always the one with all the prestige. Teams of pigeons are generally larger than they used to be.

On the feeding, because fanciers are more interested in sprint racing the feed is lighter and also kept much tighter. I have to smile when fanciers are proud to put video clips of their pigeons falling over each other to get into the loft when called. I’m not saying that they shouldn’t respond to your call, but to have them trapping so quick they have to be half starved. These video clips don’t impress me. These birds will give everything to get back to the loft quickly, as they will think that if they don’t they will go hungry. But if anything goes wrong during the race they have no reserves to help them. I would always prefer to have contented pigeons that have a love for home. 

On the breeding, as I’ve said, to much is put on having the latest fad. People seem to think that because someone is winning with them they must be the best around. Their lofts are then filled with these “in” pigeons, most unproven, and forget about their old families. Then when the new ones don’t work or a different family suddenly become the next must have, the team is changed again. The trouble is nowadays is that few have the patience to test and develop a team of their own. 

In conclusion I would say that the modern day pigeons aren’t any better than those of the past. The management is different. 

Just want to enjoy your pigeons in whatever type of racing you want. If you respect and care for your birds the best you can they will repay you in the enjoyment you get from them. 


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buster121
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What a brilliant post Andy


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Andy123
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Posted by: @buster121

What a brilliant post Andy

Thanks mate. I think the biggest thing you need to be a good fancier is patience. 

For some it has become much more of a business now rather than a hobby.

A good, although sad, post you put up the other day was that you lost the grand mother of your loft. I wonder how many have pigeons of that age in their lofts nowadays and how many have a lot of descendants in the loft. 

I had a 1983 cock that I brought for the princely sum of £10 from Nigel Monks of Godalming Surrey. A friend of our dads. Nigel was giving up and we had the pick of the loft. I chose this cock. He was a 2 year old and had flown Thurso 500+ miles as a yearling. I had him until 2000 and he had filled his eggs up until then. Bred many winners and by 2000 nearly every pigeon in the loft had his genetics in them. 


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Murray
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@andy123, That is all so true.

Like the horse racing game, the big guys are getting bigger.

One prominent racehorse trainer in Australia broke in 200 yearlings last year. Unsurprisingly, they won a lot of the important 2yo races. The older horses from previous years then won many of the other group 1 races. 

What happened to the 150 which were not good enough to even win a modest race, away from the glittering lights? Good question. 

That trainer is not alone. Huge numbers are the basis of the racing industry. There may be 1000 trainers in Australia. The sport is controlled by the big trainers with hundreds of horses on their books. The small guys pick up the crumbs.

It is the same with the birds. Mark Gilbert sent (and paid for, to be fair) over 300 pigeons to ONE race from the Continent last year. Multiply that by half a dozen races, and multiply that by half a dozen professional flyers with that many birds, and the numbers are, enormous!

Same question. Where do the hundreds and thousands of 'non winners' go?

Blokes like us, with pigeons numbered in the dozens, we have slim to no chance of beating those numbers.

We are 'Pigeon fanciers'. The mugs who fund the administration, while the 'Pigeon racers' take home all the prizes. {pear}:smile:  

 

 

Regards

Murray.


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buster121
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Posted by: @murray

@andy123, That is all so true.

Like the horse racing game, the big guys are getting bigger.

One prominent racehorse trainer in Australia broke in 200 yearlings last year. Unsurprisingly, they won a lot of the important 2yo races. The older horses from previous years then won many of the other group 1 races. 

What happened to the 150 which were not good enough to even win a modest race, away from the glittering lights? Good question. 

That trainer is not alone. Huge numbers are the basis of the racing industry. There may be 1000 trainers in Australia. The sport is controlled by the big trainers with hundreds of horses on their books. The small guys pick up the crumbs.

It is the same with the birds. Mark Gilbert sent (and paid for, to be fair) over 300 pigeons to ONE race from the Continent last year. Multiply that by half a dozen races, and multiply that by half a dozen professional flyers with that many birds, and the numbers are, enormous!

Same question. Where do the hundreds and thousands of 'non winners' go?

Blokes like us, with pigeons numbered in the dozens, we have slim to no chance of beating those numbers.

We are 'Pigeon fanciers'. The mugs who fund the administration, while the 'Pigeon racers' take home all the prizes. {pear}:smile:  

 

 

Murray Mark Gilbert also sent one on several occassions and won the races entered, I understand what you are saying and agree but needed to show otherside of the coin

 


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killer
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Hard work never killed anyone ,lol


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Murray
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@buster121, absolutely, but my point is, the big guys have become very big indeed. Being able to send 300 pigeons to one race is astonishing!

 

Regards

Murray.


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killer
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As long as they pay there entree fee it’s more prize money for the winner ,that’s why I like pools ,you have to pick your clock bird ,


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Andy123
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Doesn’t worry me how many others send. I’ll just continue to send what’s right and select races. The big senders have still got to have them right. Where they do gain is in a bad race where they are more likely to have something get through. Also with a large team they aren’t so easily wiped out in a bad race. Other than that they are still there to be beaten. 


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buster121
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Posted by: @murray

@buster121, absolutely, but my point is, the big guys have become very big indeed. Being able to send 300 pigeons to one race is astonishing!

 

100% agree mate


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grizzlecock
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Posted by: @killer

As long as they pay there entree fee it’s more prize money for the winner ,that’s why I like pools ,you have to pick your clock bird ,

doesnt work like that here...they take money out the entry fees to put into prize money.. nat clubs that is..even little clubs do it ..and usually they make you pay1or2 pound extra for your first bird on the sheet to boost prize money its a disgrace...

   these jokers do not have the intelligence to use 1in 4 pooling instead of 10/20 to 1 system....


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killer
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I can see the problem over there , here only one prize per loft ,to fair to the other guys racing ,let’s face it position in the short races count ,as does wind direction ,pools are the fairest way ,you must pick your bird ,& not try & buy the race , 

This post was modified 4 weeks ago by killer

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Andy123
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You can pool as many as you want, or can afford, over here. Both in section and open. 

We used to do a snowball in the Worthing club many years ago. You could only snowball one pigeon. That pigeon didn’t only have to be your first pigeon but also had to win the race. If the winner of the race wasn’t snowballed the prize money in that pool would roll on to the next week. If not won for a few weeks the pot could get quite big. 


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